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Local racer finishes 12th at American E-Kart Championship

Alese Piety, the only woman at finals

Posted 12/31/69

Alese Piety, a sophomore in the automotive program at Florida State College in Jacksonville, represented North Florida at the American E-Kart Championship in Illinois last weekend. The racer from …

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Local racer finishes 12th at American E-Kart Championship

Alese Piety, the only woman at finals


Posted

Alese Piety, a sophomore in the automotive program at Florida State College in Jacksonville, represented North Florida at the American E-Kart Championship in Illinois last weekend. The racer from Green Cove Springs finished 12th overall. She hopes to gain experience and eventually drive a sports car in the International Motor Sports Association.

Alese Piety’s racing career shifted into a higher gear at the American E-Kart Championship last weekend at Mokena, Illinois.

The racer from Green Cove Springs learned consistency is more important to maintain momentum than mashing the gas pedal.

“I learned so much,” she said after finishing 12th. “It was a good trip. I want to get my racing license. My goal is to be in a Porsche. I’m really into IMSA. I always go to Daytona (for the Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona). I think I’m going to be a good fit for that.”

Piety was one of 19 regional winners at the national championship. She qualified at the Autobahn Indoor Speedway in Jacksonville and was the only woman at the finals.

The National Championship was a four-day event on two indoor circuits. Racers were provided electric-powered karts from the World Karting Association (WKA), and the organizers switched karts after each round, similar to the old International Race of Champions Series. That way, if one kart was faster than the others, each racer had the benefit of driving it. Last weekend’s championship was the only event for electric-powered karts approved by the WKA.

The tracks – Monaco and Le Mans – were slick and twisting, Piety said. It took less than 21 seconds to complete a lap. The difference between Monaco’s fastest qualifier and Piety was just 0.34 seconds – less time than a sneeze.

“I moved up some positions, and I had some really good times (on Day 3),” Piety said. “We had 16 heat races and the finals. I realize you have to be consistent to keep your momentum. I want to keep racing.”