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Read Between the Wines

Book club shares insights during periodic public readings

By Lee Wardlaw lee@claytodayonline.com
Posted 7/13/23

GREEN COVE SPRINGS – Book lovers discussed the deeper meaning of the novel “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” for the monthly Read Between the Wines while enjoying cocktails and fresh-to-order …

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Read Between the Wines

Book club shares insights during periodic public readings


Posted

GREEN COVE SPRINGS – Book lovers discussed the deeper meaning of the novel “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” for the monthly Read Between the Wines while enjoying cocktails and fresh-to-order food at Red’s Wine Bar last Thursday.

The women readers were led through the program by thought-provoking questions by Jennifer Goss, Programming Associate for Culture and Recreation for the county’s library services.The book, written by Lori Gottlieb, is a memoir and self-help book that explores the experience of both the therapist and the patient in the counseling industry. The book follows the author, a psychotherapist, as she shares her journeys while also recounting the stories of four of her patients.

Gottlieb begins the book by releasing her own experience after an unexpected breakup. As she navigates her emotional turmoil, she decided to seek therapy to understand her feelings better and gain more perspective into her own life. The story then shifts toward the personal journeys and stories of her patients, a diverse group of individuals grappling with their unique challenges. That included John, a successful television producer diagnosed with terminal cancer, who struggles with anger and denial, and Rita, a senior citizen mourning the death of her husband who finds it difficult to let go of the past. There is Julie, a young woman in her 20s battling with self-destructive patterns in her relationships, and Charlotte, a mysterious patient who is reluctant to open up and hides behind a sarcastic facade.

One resident said the book deeply moved her. She said that she nearly found herself in tears a third of the way through the novel. That’s because she had initial doubts, but she found it profoundly relatable after continuing. The journey of reading the book from cover to cover was an eye-opening experience. Guests shared their thoughts during the group’s 90-minute journey of questions, answers, and insights. Still, the hottest topic on the menu of questions asked by Goss was the impact that a digitally-connected society had on the emotional well-being of people.In her book, Gottlieb discusses and highlights the emotional tolls caused by contemporary culture. Residents shared personal experiences of changes in their well-being and those of their loved ones, several agreeing that the trend mainly affected several in the younger generation, including their children.That conversation also touched on the differences in interaction and communication among generations, with children, teens and young adults heavily relying on taxing, Snapchat, and social media. Attendees expressed their concerns about the lack of deep, meaningful conversations and lamented the lack of learning and

culture exchange that some may face

because of it.

A comparison was also drawn between therapy, which helps individuals personally confront and address their issues and

religion, which encourages believers to let go of their concerns through faith.

The end of the meeting came reflections on the importance of being comfortable in loneliness, solitude and silence. Some residents shared their desire to break free from the need for instant answers provided by smartphones and embrace the wonders of finding wisdom and discovery.

The meeting provided members with an engaging platform to explore the themes of “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” and open up discussions on modern life, mental well-being, and several other topics.

This month, County Library Book Clubs will also meet at the Orange Park Library on Thursday, July 18, at 6 p.m., where residents will discuss the “Thursday Murder Club” by Richard Osman.

To find more about Read Between the Wines and other book and adult events offered through the county libraries, visit www.claycountygov.com/community/library.