Bourré Construction Company building toward the future

Company works to meeting challenges of today, Clay’s fast-growing future

By Kathleen Chambelss For Clay Today
Posted 9/22/21

CLAY TODAY – With so much growth in Clay County, particularly with new residential areas, Michael Bourré Construction Company has become a very busy man.

His company, Bourré Construction Group, knows just how …

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Bourré Construction Company building toward the future

Company works to meeting challenges of today, Clay’s fast-growing future

Posted

CLAY TODAY – With so much growth in Clay County, particularly with new residential areas, Michael Bourré has become a very busy man.

His company, Bourré Construction Group, knows just how important it is to get every small detail right, and that’s part of the reason he’s so active in organizations such as NEFBA and the Florida Builders Commission. Though Bourré is a busy man, he takes time to give each activity the best version of himself he can. His best tip was to stagger his philanthropic adventures.

“As one is unwinding, I step into another community service project so I can focus on my family first and then the business,” he said.

Governor DeSantis appointed the former president of NE Florida Builders Association to the Florida Building Code Commission in 2020. The committee oversees all the old building codes and requirements and determines what changes need to be made to keep homeowners and builders safe. In the 1990s, Hurricane Andrew rendered the former codes ineffective in the face of severe natural disaster. As things continue to change every year, codes are updated and enforced.

Currently, they are working on the seventh rendition of the code, and it’s not even in its last form. Though that may seem daunting to builders and homeowners alike, Bourré wants to make it known that they’re not setting out to make the job impossible.

“One of the hardest parts of the job is making sure that we’re not making it too impossible for builders to complete or too expensive for a first-time homebuilder to buy,” he said.

Especially in Clay, where major growth has created a challenge to expand and maintain roadways. With the ease of access to other areas in Jacksonville, such as the Southside or Riverside, many citizens have moved to Clay’s laid-back environment and natural beauty.

“We’re seeing a lot of growth in our more rural areas,” Bourré said. “Especially in equestrian neighborhoods or waterfront property.”

Although new residents don’t always have or want horses; the neighborhoods are often quiet, safe and have areas to move around with more space such as trails and parks that are often multipurpose. Many luxury homes have gone up, with the market full of people who want to take a step back and enjoy a more rustic approach to living- something Bourré can appreciate. He was a U.S. Marine and remembers these are the things they fought for – the American Dream and the places back home.

Whether the recent growth in county neighborhoods are first timers or people looking to upgrade, Bourré caters to every sector of the market.

“We provide all services, renovation and extension or additions, as well as ground up construction. Much of it is through word of mouth and because of our reputation with former clients,” he said.

Much of Bourré’s work is through referrals. Former clients who’ve experienced the other company’s work often refer friends or acquaintances to him. Because of that, Bourré said he’s seen a bit of everything.

“Those that may work remotely through COVID are coming to Florida,” Bourré said. “I’ve seen many people from the west coast and northeast especially who want to live in Florida’s warmer climate and experience the freedoms that we can take advantage of here.”

When COVID hit, it forced many areas across the United States into a complete shutdown, leaving the construction industry in a lurch. Gov. Ron DeSantis saw this problem as it unfolded, and,to combat it, he worked closely with the construction industry. By appointing contractors, architects,and engineers from across Florida, DeSantis helped to keep one of Florida’s most vital industries alive, Bourré said. “We could not do what we’re doing as a state if it weren’t for our governor,” he said. “Construction was an essential service, and thanks to him we continued to boom.”

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