This Week in History 9/16/21

Posted 9/15/21

Five years ago, 2016• The Orange Park Town Council decides not to use money generated by fines for red-light camera violations to pay for a new officer.• The Clay County School Board passes …

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This Week in History 9/16/21

Posted

Five years ago, 2016

• The Orange Park Town Council decides not to use money generated by fines for red-light camera violations to pay for a new officer.
• The Clay County School Board passes a $379.6 million budget that includes a $31.2 million increase while reducing the millage rate to .375.
• The College of Missionary Aviation teaches young pilots at the Keystone Heights Airport.

10 years ago, 2011

• The Board of County Commissioners raise the millage rate from 7.45 to 7.85 to reduce a possible $3 million shortfall in funding.
• Haven Hospice breaks ground for a new 18-bed Custead Care Center on a seven-acre plot on Blanding Boulevard in Orange Park.
• Students and faculty stood outside and formed the numeral “50” to honor W.E. Cherry Elementary’s 50th anniversary in Orange Park.

20 years ago, 2001


• Clay County reacts to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, U.S. Penatagon and in a Pennsylvania field by offering to give blood and money.
• A flood watch is issued for low-lying areas ahead of a tropical depression that formed in the Gulf of Mexico.
• The Clay High football team outlasts Orange Park, 34-29, after the Raiders’ rally came up short after they scored 14 points in a three-minute span late in the fourth quarter.

30 years ago, 1991

• Convicted child molester, Keith Hall, escapes from the Clay County Jail following a “mix-up” in paperwork.

• Nick Chapman is selected as the new Clay County Health Department director after Ed Stansel retires after 14 years.
• Two Green Cove Springs insurance agents, Patricia Knowles and Willaim Harold Knowles, are fined by State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner Tom Gallagher for misappropriating insurance premiums.

40 years ago, 1981

• The Green Cove Springs City Council is concerned Clay County is “stalling” in its bid to purchase the Rosemary Hill Landfill. The county has offered $1,450 an acre for the facility, but has yet to make an offer on the equipment.
• St. Johns River Community College President Dr. Robert McLendon calls Green Cove Springs “a sleeping giant” for community development.
• The Helm Funeral Home celebrated its 20th year with an open house in its new building west of Green Cove Springs.

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