Heavy Thunderstorms and Heavy Rain, 72°
Weather sponsored by:

Orange Park's Day serves as culinary specialist in Navy

By Megan Brown, Navy Office of Community Outreach
Posted 6/13/24

MAYPORT – Petty Officer 1st Class Kyle Day, a native of Orange Park, serves aboard USS Cooperstown, a U.S. Navy warship. The skills and values needed to succeed in the Navy are similar to …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for subscribing.

Single day pass

You also have the option of purchasing 24 hours of access, for $1.00. Click here to purchase a single day pass.

Orange Park's Day serves as culinary specialist in Navy


Posted

MAYPORT – Petty Officer 1st Class Kyle Day, a native of Orange Park, serves aboard USS Cooperstown, a U.S. Navy warship. The skills and values needed to succeed in the Navy are similar to those in Jacksonville.

“I learned growing up to treat everyone equally and with respect,” said Day. “In the Navy, you never know what kind of day someone else is having. They could be having the worst day, but if you treat them with respect, you can make their day a little better.”

Day joined the Navy 12 years ago. Today, Day serves as a culinary specialist.
“I joined the Navy to have more structure in my life,” said Day. “I also wanted to travel.”

According to Navy officials, Cooperstown is a fast, optimally manned, mission-tailored surface combatant that operates in near-shore and open-ocean environments. Littoral combat ships integrate with joint, combined, manned, and unmanned teams to support forward presence, maritime security, sea control, and deterrence missions around the globe.

Littoral combat ships are hybrid surface combatants that lead manned-unmanned teams using unmanned aerial systems like the Fire Scout and Expeditionary Ordnance Disposal forces unmanned underwater vehicles. They conduct forward and maritime security missions like the Secretary of Defense Oceania Maritime Security Initiative. Due to their shallow-depth hull, the ships also strengthen partnerships through port visits in small island nations like Tahiti and Fiji.

With 90% of global commerce traveling by sea and access to the internet relying on the security of undersea fiber optic cables, Navy officials continue to emphasize that the prosperity of the United States is directly linked to recruiting and retaining talented people from across America's rich fabric.

"We will earn and reinforce the trust and confidence of the American people every day," said Adm. Lisa Franchetti, Chief of Naval Operations. "Together, we will deliver the Navy the nation needs.”

Day has many opportunities to achieve accomplishments during military service.
“I am most proud of earning my first Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for my work helping commission the Cooperstown,” said Day. “I am proud of that because I spent a long time in the Navy doing everything I thought I was supposed to be doing but didn’t earn recognition for it. So to be able to finally earn recognition for something I did made me really proud.”

Day serves a Navy that operates far forward, around the world and around the clock, promoting the nation's prosperity and security.

“Serving in the Navy means structure,” said Day. “It means always having a home and having people there for you always. There is always someone there for you and something there for you.”

Day is grateful to others for helping make a Navy career possible.“I want to thank my wife, Gina Day, my daughter, Theia and my dad, James Day, for giving me their guidance, support, and love,” added Day. “I also want to thank Chief Culinary Specialist Reed Williams, Chief Culinary Specialist Laurence Matthews and Chief Logistics Specialist Figuerroa.”