Orange Park Sergeant recalls 10-week FBI Academy certification

Cody Monroe completes 10-week course to enhance law enforcement technology

By Nick Blank nick@claytodayonline.com
Posted 1/5/22

ORANGE PARK – The FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia allows command staff of local law enforcement agencies to learn cutting-edge techniques and network with others.

Orange Park Police …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for subscribing.

Single day pass

You also have the option of purchasing 24 hours of access, for $1.00. Click here to purchase a single day pass.

Orange Park Sergeant recalls 10-week FBI Academy certification

Cody Monroe completes 10-week course to enhance law enforcement technology

Posted

ORANGE PARK – The FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia allows command staff of local law enforcement agencies to learn cutting-edge techniques and network with others.

Orange Park Police Department Sgt. Cody Monroe recently attended the 10-week course. Chief Gary Goble nominated Monroe for the opportunity. In his 15-year career at OPPD, Monroe was a patrol officer for three years, a corporal for three years, a detective for six years and now he’s been a sergeant for about three years.

“I wear many different hats. I love the small town and the people,” Monroe said. “I think it’s a great place to work and I’ve truly enjoyed my time there.”

To qualify for the academy, the candidates need at least five years of high-level law enforcement experience, need to be at least 25 years old, have 60 college credit hours or similar experience and must agree to remain in law enforcement for a minimum of three years after their academy stay is completed.

One of the greatest things Monroe learned was from law enforcement officers attending from across the country, including from Spain or the United Arab Emirates, with lessons from riots or the D.C. sniper attacks. Monroe said the 140 peers who attended with him could act as a soundboard for different situations.

“Each one of them has dealt with different things. You can learn what other agencies have done and bring that back,” Monroe said. “It’s that cooperation nationwide you can bounce ideas off of.”

The attendees were also given a rundown of the FBI’s capabilities to combat terrorism and how they could assist on a local level, but also aspects of law enforcement like fitness, communication and leadership. Forensics, in particular, were a highlight, he added, whether it was techniques about fingerprints, shoe prints or handwriting.

“It was neat to learn about different cases they helped with and how they work with local law enforcement as new technology develops,” Monroe said. “It’s a comprehensive list of courses they offer, and the networking is one of the greatest opportunities out there.”

Continuing education is the main goal, but the academy graduates also must endure the famous “Yellow Brick Road.” The 6.1-mile run is in a hilly, wooded trail and participants must scale walls and rocks, traverse creeks, jump through windows and crawl under barbed wire.

When students complete it, they receive a yellow brick to recognize the undertaking. Built by Marines in the early 1980s, they began placing yellow bricks on the course as a guide and the tradition later took hold in 1988.

“You run with the friends you’ve made over the 10 weeks. It’s not easy, but it was a great opportunity,” Monroe said. “It was exciting and a great activity.”

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here